Wednesday, May 23, 2012
columbusdispatch:

Some historical trivia from The Dispatch  “Look Back” blog:
This photo taken around the turn of the century shows the F.W. Atcherson livery stable at 56-62 E. Gay St. in downtown Columbus. (Today, if you head east alon Gay Street from the Residence Inn, this is between the Inn and the parking lot at the corner of Gay and Third.) 
Signs read “hacks, coupes, baggage, livery, automobiles.” The smaller building, at lower right, is the office of veterinarians Leist and Brandewie.  Stairs at the lower left led to more veterinarians — Hillock and Hillock.
More at the blog…

columbusdispatch:

Some historical trivia from The Dispatch “Look Back” blog:

This photo taken around the turn of the century shows the F.W. Atcherson livery stable at 56-62 E. Gay St. in downtown Columbus. (Today, if you head east alon Gay Street from the Residence Inn, this is between the Inn and the parking lot at the corner of Gay and Third.)

Signs read “hacks, coupes, baggage, livery, automobiles.” The smaller building, at lower right, is the office of veterinarians Leist and Brandewie. Stairs at the lower left led to more veterinarians — Hillock and Hillock.

More at the blog…

columbusdispatch:

Some historical trivia from The Dispatch  “Look Back” blog:
This photo taken around the turn of the century shows the F.W. Atcherson livery stable at 56-62 E. Gay St. in downtown Columbus. (Today, if you head east alon Gay Street from the Residence Inn, this is between the Inn and the parking lot at the corner of Gay and Third.) 
Signs read “hacks, coupes, baggage, livery, automobiles.” The smaller building, at lower right, is the office of veterinarians Leist and Brandewie.  Stairs at the lower left led to more veterinarians — Hillock and Hillock.
More at the blog…

columbusdispatch:

Some historical trivia from The Dispatch “Look Back” blog:

This photo taken around the turn of the century shows the F.W. Atcherson livery stable at 56-62 E. Gay St. in downtown Columbus. (Today, if you head east alon Gay Street from the Residence Inn, this is between the Inn and the parking lot at the corner of Gay and Third.)

Signs read “hacks, coupes, baggage, livery, automobiles.” The smaller building, at lower right, is the office of veterinarians Leist and Brandewie. Stairs at the lower left led to more veterinarians — Hillock and Hillock.

More at the blog…

Saturday, May 12, 2012
columbusdispatch:

Think the dress on the right is too short?
In 1969, Ohio Senate leaders thought so.
On the right is UPI reporter Betty Work, then 25, with Sen. Marigene Valiquette, D-Toledo. She was asked to leave the reporters’ section of the Senate floor because of her outfit.
“She held her ground,” The Dispatch reported then, “and the attention of the senators and galleryites. There were anonymous reports that her hemline strayed some six inches above her knees.”
Read more at The Dispatch’s “Look Back” blog

columbusdispatch:

Think the dress on the right is too short?

In 1969, Ohio Senate leaders thought so.

On the right is UPI reporter Betty Work, then 25, with Sen. Marigene Valiquette, D-Toledo. She was asked to leave the reporters’ section of the Senate floor because of her outfit.

“She held her ground,” The Dispatch reported then, “and the attention of the senators and galleryites. There were anonymous reports that her hemline strayed some six inches above her knees.”

Read more at The Dispatch’s “Look Back” blog

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
From The Dispatch’s “Look Back” blog comes this story and photo from Sept. 21, 1927:
“Marie Finnell, 30 West Fifth avenue, who is employed as a model at the Lazarus store was among the first to pose before the photomaton, the new automatic camera installed at the Lazarus store. The machine takes eight pictures in eight seconds and turns out the completed product in eight minutes. Three photomatons will be operated at the store with an attendant at each machine to explain its operation to subjects. The Russian who designed the machine, was paid one million dollars for his invention.”
The Columbus Dispatch 
Monday, March 12, 2012 Wednesday, November 9, 2011

columbusdispatch:

Want to win $200?

Get a time machine and head to the year 1908, when we would’ve awarded you cash for using your best penmanship to write “The Dispatch is read in our home.”

columbusdispatch:

Don’t be alarmed at 2 p.m. today, when FEMA does its first nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System on your television or radio.

Meanwhile, check out these photos Dispatch librarian Linda Deitch found in our archives. These Civil Defense vehicles performed tasks that were later transferred to FEMA, which was founded during the Carter Administration. The top photo shows a Civil Defense “duck,” or amphibious truck, which is transporting families to a local junior high school in 1959. Pictured below is a Civil Defense rescue truck.

Read more about the Franklin County Civil Defense program at the Dispatch “Look Back” blog.

columbusdispatch:

A crowd gathers outside the offices of The Columbus Dispatch on  Gay Street (our location until November 1925) in 1908. We think they’re  looking at a 100,000-candle-power searchlight that flashed election  returns. The direction of light signified a particular candidate’s  lead.

columbusdispatch:

A crowd gathers outside the offices of The Columbus Dispatch on Gay Street (our location until November 1925) in 1908. We think they’re looking at a 100,000-candle-power searchlight that flashed election returns. The direction of light signified a particular candidate’s lead.

Monday, June 13, 2011
columbusdispatch:

The Dispatch’s “Look Back” blog recently posted lots of trivia about a little-known cemetery in Columbus where thousands of Confederate soldiers are buried. Camp Chase was once a 160-acre prisoner-of-war camp for the thousands of Confederate troops the Union Army had captured during the Civil War, but all that is left now is the cemetery. Much of the land where Camp Chase was erected is now the community known as Westgate. Check out their post — it’s pretty interesting!
More Camp Chase links:
Article: Supporters wish Camp Chase were less of a secret
Photos: Yesterday’s memorial ceremony at Camp Chase Cemetery

columbusdispatch:

The Dispatch’s “Look Back” blog recently posted lots of trivia about a little-known cemetery in Columbus where thousands of Confederate soldiers are buried. Camp Chase was once a 160-acre prisoner-of-war camp for the thousands of Confederate troops the Union Army had captured during the Civil War, but all that is left now is the cemetery. Much of the land where Camp Chase was erected is now the community known as Westgate.

Check out their post — it’s pretty interesting!

More Camp Chase links: